NONAGON.style Artist of the Month: Felled Light

It’s easier than ever to fill your home with furniture. But we’re beginning to see a shift in the trend of filling your home with the latest, or the cheapest available – instead, many of us are saving our big buys until we find that perfect piece. In this move towards finding something bespoke and unique, there is a focus on making your home a place that says something about your taste and personality, and by curating a house with the items on which you bestow greater meaning, you are also giving importance to the heritage of an object and the memories around it.

Photo of Felled Light arists, by photographer Annabelle Antas on NONAGON.styleimage by Annabelle Antas

Our featured artist of the month is Danny Treacy, who creates striking light pieces from felled wood. I met with Treacy in his studio in London, a self-constructed outbuilding in sunny Walthamstow. We discussed the journey of Felled Light, his approach to design, and the fun to be had in the woods.

Danny Treacy in his home studio in London, where he makes his Felled Light collection - interview on NONAGON.style

Danny Treacy's Felled Light collection, on NONAGON.styleimage by Felled Light

Treacy enjoys spending time in Epping Forest. This large section of ancient woodland is the biggest in London, stretching from the north-east of the city and up into Essex. For centuries it was a royal hunting ground; a place where kings and queens would hunt deer, and commoners were permitted to graze cattle and gather wood. These days it’s a restorative block of fresh air where people go to walk their dogs, stretch their legs and enjoy the open natural space so close to the city center. Given the amount of time Treacy is in the forest, it was only a matter of when he would begin to bring some of it home with him.

Photo of Felled Light arists, by photographer Annabelle Antas on NONAGON.styleimage by Annabelle Antas

Photo of Felled Light arists, by photographer Annabelle Antas on NONAGON.styleimage by Annabelle Antas

It started as a project from necessity, invented from the need for a good looking lamp rather than from the desire to design something. While trying to find the perfect solution for lighting his house, he noticed that the deep curves of the tree branches were much like the shapes of a tall Arco Floor Lamp.

Danny Treacy's Felled Light collection, on NONAGON.styleimage by Felled Light

The wood he uses is sourced from Epping Forest, with permission from the City of London Corporation and Senior Forest Keeper Nick Baker, whose job it is to look after the land. Treacy buys up the larger pieces of wood that have been cleared, and seasons the wood to prevent dry rot. It can take up to two years for the wood to dry out completely so that it is ready to be used. Otherwise it could decay, crack or split. Because of the long wait time before he can finish a light, given that it takes so long for the wood to be prepared, there is something even more special about the outcome. These lamps make up his Felled Light series.

Photo of Felled Light arists, by photographer Annabelle Antas on NONAGON.styleimage by Annabelle Antas

Photo of Felled Light arists, by photographer Annabelle Antas on NONAGON.styleimage by Annabelle Antas

Treacy and I discussed that the popularity for Scandinavian and mid-century furniture was because of an appreciation for the natural forms. There is something inherently beautiful about wood, and its graceful shapes. “Wood adjusts, it does its own thing and reacts to its environment,” explains Treacy.

Felled Light on NONAGON.styleimage by Felled Light

Felled Light on NONAGON.styleimage by Felled Light

The Japanese aesthetics of wabi-sabi have greatly influenced Felled Light. The philosophy admires beauty that is imperfect, impermanent and incomplete, and Treacy professes that he is “interested in the differences” of the wood, and that they are even more fascinating that neither one is the same. It appeals to his fondness for found objects and craftsmanship.

Photo of Felled Light arists, by photographer Annabelle Antas on NONAGON.styleimage by Annabelle Antas

His background is in photography, rather than woodwork. But Treacy enjoyed the challenge of learning about the material and getting to know its ways. The heavier pieces provide the stability of the base, but there were many prototypes before finding the final shapes and methods. “I got a chainsaw and started from there really,” says Treacy. One thing he has learnt is that the angle of the chainsaw can greatly affect how anchored and steady the end result will be.

Danny Treacy's Felled Light collection, on NONAGON.styleimage by Felled Light

Felled Light on NONAGON.style

In addition to sourcing the trees from the forest, the brass, bulbs and flex for the electrical components are also sustainably sourced from the UK, and PAT tested by a qualified electrician to make sure they are regulation compliant.

Danny Treacy's Felled Light collection, on NONAGON.styleimage by Felled Light

Danny Treacy's Felled Light collection, on NONAGON.styleimage by Felled Light

Cuckoo - Danny Treacy's Felled Light collection, on NONAGON.styleimage by Felled Light

As well as floor lamps, Treacy’s collection of wall lamps are also popular. Each style is named after a different bird found in Epping Forest, such as the Cuckoo and the Woodpecker.

Felled Light on NONAGON.style

Felled Light by Danny Treacy on NONAGON.styleimage by Felled Light

Photo of Felled Light arists, by photographer Annabelle Antas on NONAGON.styleimage by Annabelle Antas

Recently Treacy took his lamps to the BBC Countryfile Live event, where they were eagerly snapped up. Now he is waiting for the next batch of wood to be seasoned, so that he can get the next collection of Felled Light lamps ready. Given the journey of each of the lamps, it’s been wonderful to see how the wood can grow and adjust to take on a new life. Treacy’s unique lights are definitely something I would love to bring home.

Project: Felled Light

Design: Felled Light

Photos: Danny Treacy and Annabelle Antas