Edible Sculptures and Cake Art with Dinara Kasko | NONAGON.style
Edible Sculptures and Cake Art with Dinara Kasko

Edible Sculptures and Cake Art with Dinara Kasko

Architect explores the question: When does ordinary food become 'art'?

Isobel McKenzie
Written by –
Isobel McKenzie
on October 3rd 2018
Originally from London, she is enthralled with the majestic collection of curves and lines that make up the British capital. It's fascinating to see how modern skyscrapers and historic landmarks muddle together in every city. Her Instagram feed @Isobel_McKenzie is usually full of spiral staircases and tall buildings.
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Originally trained as an architect, Dinara Kasko became familiar with designing buildings and structures, but her passion for pastry eventually won out. Working with 3D modeling, she has developed a method of making sculptural cake creations featuring a 3D printer to construct silicon cake molds. Her creations involve a lot of mathematics, playing on geometric design from buildings and biomimicry.

 

With architectural characteristics, an unconventional approach has opened a fascinating look at where food and art meet.

Growing up in a small town, Kasko moved at 17 to study architecture in Ukraine’s second-largest city, Kharkov. Her background was always creative, singing in choirs and taking dance classes. Most of her favorite subjects included sculpture, painting graphics and of course 3D modeling.

 

“When I was in school,” describes Kasko, “I took dancing classes for 9 years and wanted to become a dancer. Dancing was my passion at that time. I was sure that I would have my degree in choreography. When I turned 15, I went to art school and decided to become a designer.” But ultimately the passion for pastry making called her attention.

Unique cake designed by Dinara Kasko | NONAGON.style
Inside of unique cake designed by Dinara Kasko | NONAGON.style
Square cake designed by Dinara Kasko | NONAGON.style

One of the unique and fascinating things about Kasko’s sculptural cake creations is how each one feels like a scale-model of a building. Although made of pastry instead of paper, these cakes and sweet treats show attention to structure and form in an inspired way.

Chocolate cake with unique fondant and architectural structure designed by Dinara Kasko | NONAGON.style
Incredible geometric cake designed by Dinara Kasko | NONAGON.style
Cake designed by Dinara Kasko | NONAGON.style

How do you like to decorate your home?

Kasko: I live in an apartment on the 16th floor. I met a young man and helped him to decorate his apartment. Some time later, we started living together. So I live in the apartment I previously decorated for the client. The walls and floor are white almost everywhere. I like to have a lot of space and air.

 

When we moved to this apartment, it was in a minimalist style – minimum objects everywhere. Now I have a daughter, and there is a little chaos in the apartment. Also, some work equipment appeared here, and the apartment is turning into a storehouse, but I’m moving all this equipment into my own studio pretty soon and planning to turn the apartment back into minimalist style.

 

What is your favorite aesthetic for home decor?

Kasko: It’s hard to talk about it when you have a small child who throws toys everywhere, breaks things, and makes mess! If we are talking about it in general, I like different objects and accessories that can complement the design, but everything should be in moderation.

Bubbles cakes designed by architect-turned-pastry chef Dinara Kasko | NONAGON.style

Not just pretty to look at, the layers are filled with plenty of fruity flavors, exciting the tastebuds as well as the eyes.

Cut slice of bubble cakes designed by architect-turned-pastry chef Dinara Kasko | NONAGON.style

Her minimalist design aesthetic has made for popular viewing, with thousands of Instagram followers drooling over her perfectly styled cake creations. From bubbles and clouds, to slick lines and sharp edges, buying one of Kasko’s silicon molds comes with a recipe to get the same effect.

Geometric cake designed and made by Dinara Kasko | NONAGON.style

The cakes are structural, with different layers of complexity both inside and out. You might find yourself building a carrot sponge cake, a whipped cream mousse with yoghurt, or a lime basil jelly.

Bubble cake | NONAGON.style
Dinara Kasko demonstrates 3D modeling used to make her famous geometric treats | NONAGON.style

When Kasko is creating these cakes, one of the first steps is visualizing it in a 3D modeling program. With a 3D printer, she is able to print the silicon mold exactly to the shape she requires.

Dinara Kasko demonstrates 3D modeling used to make her famous geometric treats | NONAGON.style
Patissiere Dinara Kasko demonstrates silicon molds used to make her famous geometric treats | NONAGON.style

Building up the layers inside the cake molds requires plenty of patience to ensure each one sits at the right level.

Patissiere Dinara Kasko demonstrates silicon molds used to make her famous geometric treats | NONAGON.style
Patissiere Dinara Kasko demonstrates silicon molds used to make her famous geometric treats | NONAGON.style
Dinara Kasko demonstrates 3D modeling used to make her famous geometric treats | NONAGON.style
Concrete -like geometric shapes are actually cakes made by trained architect-turned-pastry chef Dinara Kasko | NONAGON.style

One of the fascinating ways that architecture plays through in these cake designs is with these geometric cakes. The mousse, made with a creamy texture and matte finish, resemble like concrete. Incredibly, the form holds its shape.

 

Her work has been featured at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and now she has been able to open a pastry studio in Kharkov testing recipes and shapes. With great skill and dexterity, Kasko’s love of design, sculpture and architectural know-how have lent her a stunning new art form. It’s safe to say she loves what she does. “I prefer to say that it’s not my work, but hobby,” she explains. “Of course, it can be difficult physically when I work a lot in the kitchen and travel to teach classes – in these cases it can be called work. But when I am at home working on new projects, that’s my hobby.”

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