Korean Photographer Kim Woo Young's Urban Odyssey | NONAGON.style: inspiration of home decor, architecture, interior design
Kim Woo Young: Blur Boundary Between Photography and Painting

Kim Woo Young: Blur Boundary Between Photography and Painting

His work provokes the mundane, humdrum existence of modern society.

Cristina Ng
Written by –
Cristina Ng
on October 14th 2019
As a Gemini, Cristina is always curious about life and pursuing to challenge herself. She is invested in telling good stories to more people and zealous about video shooting and editing.

She believes to be new is to be young again.
Project:

Kim Woo Young’s Urban Odyssey

Design:

Presented by Soluna Fine Art

Photographer:

At the very first sight, it is hard to recognise Kim Woo Young’s works as photographs but as paintings. Due to the minimalistic nature and the little-to-none indications of the third dimension, his work just seems like lifeless walls of colours.

 

This South Korean photographer uses the camera as the recording tool, to capture the meaning of dilapidated and abandoned settings, especially those that are marginalised by the modern era, society and people.

 

This Autumn, Kim presents 12 photographs taken in the U.S. and South Korea in his first solo exhibition in Hong Kong. The collection was inspired by empty streets and abandoned buildings. Named as “Urban Odyssey”, the exhibition invites audience to experience a visual voyage to explore the artist’s unique interpretation of an urban landscape or nature scene with colours.

home decor | interior design | inspiration | architecture
home decor | interior design | inspiration | architecture
home decor | interior design | inspiration | architecture
home decor | interior design | inspiration | architecture

Kim intentionally flattens his images to prevent the audience from presumptuously viewing the works one would conventionally do with documentary photography. To achieve that, Kim goes the extra mile to re-visit the designated site on multiple occasions, each at a different time, in search of the right composition and moment. A slight change in time, weather and surroundings could greatly affect the colours and the overall tones of the images, consequently, it could take Kim weeks to shoot his subjects.

home decor | interior design | inspiration | architecture
home decor | interior design | inspiration | architecture

“Sometimes people look at my (previous) works and the first thing they ask me would be where I took the image. When you look at a photograph, you want to read into what is being captured, rather than simply observing what is being presented. So I sometimes wait until dawn when there is no shadow or people on the streets to take the image. By doing so, I make my work very plain and 2D, and people will have to pay attention to the colours, textures and details that they would otherwise fail to notice.” Kim explains his motivation.

Despite these images appear to be black-and-white, they are in colours, rather than the outcome of Kim’s retouching. Such uncanny feature has to do with Kim’s ideal shooting time: the early morning and rainy days, and preferably winter time.

home decor | interior design | inspiration | architecture
home decor | interior design | inspiration | architecture

Kim’s exhibition is showing at Soluna Fine Art in Sheung Wan until October 19. If you are interested in the blurry boundary between photography and painting, don’t miss it!

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