Indoor Gardening Made Easy with These Hydroponic Tech Planters | NONAGON.style
Indoor Gardening Made Easy with These Tech Planters

Indoor Gardening Made Easy with These Tech Planters

Written by –
NONAGON.style Team
on May 17th 2016

You’re not alone – some of us just don’t have green thumbs, and end up sad and disappointed with a shriveled up basil plant on our kitchen countertop. But, as is the way, technology is moving forward and now growing and maintaining your mini indoor garden is as easy as could be. With the help of a self-watering system and maybe an app to keep you on track, here’s our run down of self watering planters for your home.

Modern sprout eco-friendly planter | NONAGON.style
Modern sprout eco-friendly planter | NONAGON.style

Modern Sprout

Many companies are providing ways to grow plants by using hydroponics, a system of growing without soil and using roots directly in the water. Modern Sprout has rather handsomely adapted mason jars to hold the plants and use a wicking system to draw water. These can be filled up and left in a sunny place until they bloom into something lovely. Additionally, they have a set of planters that can fill up to three pots of seeds and programmed to feed as you need.

 

Loving the chalk design, but they also have a more neutral wooden casing that would look great on the windowsill.

Click and grow smart indoor garden | NONAGON.style

Click And Grow

Showing just how easy it can be, the Click And Grow comes with little pots that you can click into the grower, and then it has its own light timer and water filter system. You can use the app that goes with it to track the plant’s typical life cycle. There are herbs, flowers and even some veggies available in their ready to grow pots, so putting them in is just a lot like changing the ink cartridge in your printer.

 

Planty smart hydroponic planter | NONAGON.style

Planty

If it all seems a bit dispiriting to plug in your plant and leave it to fend for itself, you could try Planty.

 

Only recently in production, Planty connects to your phone to tell you how the plant is doing. You can sync it with your phone and from then, on growing your plant is like playing a game. You can receive a little notification to remind you it’s time to water your plant, and there is a pump inside the container so that you can water it remotely. It’ll let you know if it’s too cold, too dark, and allow you and your friends to raise the plant together and see who’s been taking care of it.

 

Water Garden - Self cleaning fish tank planter | NONAGON.style

Water Garden

Hold up, YES, that is exactly what you think it is. Taking plant keeping to the next level, Back to the Roots have made a planter that is attached to a fish tank! While your pet fish creates its mess, the garden sucks it up and uses it to feed the plants, which in turn create food for your fish –and for you! It’s a closed loop eco-system where you get fresh food and a family pet.

 

Tower Garden | NONAGON.style
Tower Garden | NONAGON.style

Tower Garden

If after reading all of this you have started hatching schemes to grow not just a few herbs but an entire allotment, then you could try the Tower Garden. It stands at 62 inches high, and holds up to 20 plants. This planter is a bit more hands on than other ones in this list. The starter pack comes with many components including a pump, pots and pH test kits. It requires you to fill it up with mineral solution that drips down to the other plants throughout the tower.

 

If all you’ve been looking for is a way to keep your oregano growin’, maybe this will be too much. But if you’re looking to make a meal from scratch and enough cucumbers growing out of your ears to feed the neighborhood, then why not give it a go. There is a customer service hotline to guide you through it, and a year’s warranty.

 

Ikea Krydda smart indoor planter | NONAGON.style

KRYDDA/VÄXER

Hinting at just how popular indoor planting will become in the next few years, IKEA just launched their KRYDDA/VÄXER home plant range. The design looks like a mini greenhouse, with a tray for you to slot in moist plugs that you fill with seeds. Once your seedlings grow big enough, you fill the tray with pumice stones that hold water. It works much like other hydroponic designs, in that you can just pour enough water and let it get on growing with your minimal input.

 

Have you been tempted by any of these simple planter designs? What will you grow first?

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