4 Fantastic Attractions in Japan for Coffee and Art Enthusiasts | NONAGON.style
4 Fantastic Attractions in Japan for Coffee and Art Enthusiasts

4 Fantastic Attractions in Japan for Coffee and Art Enthusiasts

Cristina Ng
Written by –
Cristina Ng
on January 24th 2020
As a Gemini, Cristina is always curious about life and pursuing to challenge herself. She is invested in telling good stories to more people and zealous about video shooting and editing.

She believes to be new is to be young again.

Japan is definitely one of the most popular destinations around the world. Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Sapporo, and Nagoya all are well-known Japanese cities with a high volume of visitors.

 

No doubt that the Japanese tourism industry will take one step further this year as Tokyo is to usher in the 2020 Olympics. Meanwhile, it’s the perfect time to plan your trip to Japan at the dawn of the second decade of Millennium.

 

Our editorial team will roll out a series of Japanese inspiration collections in the months ahead, gathering the unique check-in places, the native lifestyle, and the best artisan products, in order to contribute a touch to your exciting travel around Japan. Well, today we will take a close look at 4 fantastic and intriguing coffee shops in Japan.

2D Cafe

Yes, you read right. Just like its name, 2D Cafe opens a door to the cartoon world. If you are a comic fan or simply wanna experience how it feels like stepping into a comic book, you really shouldn’t miss this amazing cafe.

 

Once go through the entrance, your world will be reduced from 3D to 2D under the function of the well-decorated monochrome interior design. Chairs, tables, walls, windows, doors, and floors are white with edges overlaid with uneven black stripes just like sketch lines. The whole thing will surely give you the illusion of being sucked into a black-and-white cartoon, and your eyes trick you into thinking whether it’s real. When you try to get out of the “comic book”, double-check before walking through the door, as it might be a drawing. Well, tell you a secret, there are real 2D stuff: Curtains and flowers are indeed flat-plane artworks.

coffee shop Japan interior design home decor architecture
image source

Teshima Art Museum Cafe

Lying on Teshima Island, Teshima Art Museum is designed by Japanese architect Ryue Nishizawa who won the Pritzker Prize. The museum resembles a drop of water, overlooking the Seto Inland Sea.

 

It isn’t allowed to take photos inside the museum. However, you can record this moment of fusion of nature, art, and architecture at the coffee shop adjacent to the museum. The shop has an analogous structure to the museum, not extending high but flat. Sunlight comes in through the huge hole, casting a shadow on people’s faces. The inner peace is right here.

coffee shop Japan interior design home decor architecture
image source
coffee shop Japan interior design home decor architecture
image source
coffee shop Japan interior design home decor architecture
coffee shop Japan interior design home decor architecture

Koffee Mameya

“Koffee Mameya” means “Beans Shop” in Japanese, a new concept shop by Omotesando Koffee. More than a cafe, though customs can order an espresso or filter coffee, it’s essentially a “coffee pharmacy” where people can taste and purchase selected beans and brew at home.

 

The shop itself is a real beauty to appreciate – a fantastic example of Japanese architecture and design, integrating new with old. The entrance resembles a traditional high-class Japanese restaurant. Slide open the wooden framed Japanese door, but watch your head as you walk in! A full shelf of beans with simple but beautiful packages will unfold in front of you. Bags are well distributed into each lattice, just like herbs in Chinese medicine shops. Besides, baristas’ lab-coat uniform renders the ambiance more like a pharmacy. After all, to many “addicts”, a fix of coffee is crucial for them to face a day.

coffee shop Japan interior design home decor architecture
image source
coffee shop Japan interior design home decor architecture
image source

さらさ西陣

From this Japanese name, you can get a glimpse of its local characteristics. It is rarely reported among the travel guides, but this coffee shop will be icing on the cake of your trip to Kyoto.

 

It is a revitalization of an old “sento”- the traditional public bath in Japanese.  As a bath country, Japanese families like to go to the sento near their homes, soaking in the huge hot hub and scrubbing each other’s back. More than a public bath, sento has become a place where shares and inherits the memory of home from generation to generation.

 

However, Traditional Public baths are fleetly disappearing in recent years. In order to retain this kind of memory, さらさ西陣 transformed a sento into a coffee shop based on its original structure. Inside, it’s not hard to find a trace of the old bath. High ceilings with skylights, which were used to vent steam, now add a touch of history. The most prominent feature of the interior design is the scale of colorful Majolica tiles which are derived from Spanish architecture and once prevailed in Japan and Taiwan. Pavonine and heat-resistant, Majolica tiles were widely applied in sentoes, while the glazed decoration today provides a vintage and charming ambiance for live shows and music lovers.

coffee shop Japan interior design home decor architecture
image source
Tags:

No products in the bag.

Stay Updated
Sign up for our newsletter and get the latest home tours and giveaways.
STAY UPDATED!
Sign up for our newsletter to get the latest home tours and giveaways.